Established August 1, 1961

Haleakalā National Park on the island of Maui was originally established in combination with Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park as “Hawai‘i National Park” in 1916, the year the National Park Service was created. They became independent in 1961. The park is a rich, 34,000-acre tapestry of biodiversity that begins at the summit of Haleakalā at 10,023ft., and cascades down to the Kīpahulu District’s black volcanic sands. More than 24,000 acres of wilderness area provide exploration opportunities ranging from high altitude cinder lands to lush coastal rainforest. Protected within Haleakalā National Park’s boundary fences are endemic Hawaiian species such as the ʻāhinahina (Haleakalā silversword), the ʻōpeʻapeʻa (Hawaiian hoary bat), the Haleakalā flightless moth, and nesting seabirds.

Cultural sites attest to many generations of Native Hawaiians in the park. Cultural practitioners visit to chant, hula, or make offerings. Because of the crystal clarity of the air at elevation, Haleakalā summit is one of the best places in the world from which to watch the stars, as the nearby telescope complex attests. Hawaiian navigators also once used the summit to train. The astonishing silence of the summit wilderness area is an official feature of the park.


Please refer to the national park page for current conditions and alerts.

To the Summit District:  Park headquarters/Visitor Center,  and the 10,023 foot (3055m) summit Visitor Center can be reached from Kahului via Route 37 to 377 to 378. Driving time to the summit from Kahului is approximately 1.5 hours.

To the Kīpahulu (coastal) District: Kīpahulu is reached via Route 36 to 360 to 31. Driving time from Kahului is approximately 3 hours.

There is no gas or food at or near the Summit District. Plan ahead.

Haleakalā National Park is open 24 hours a day year-round.

  • Park Headquarters Visitor Center is open daily from 7:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.
  • Haleakalā Visitor Center is open daily from 5:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • Kīpahulu Visitor Center is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 **Hours of operation may change due to emergency situations, without notice.

This park is large enough to encompass all weathers—summit to sea.  While the climate of Hawaiʻi is fairly consistent year-round, it’s the elevation that determines what sort of weather you should plan for.

The entrance station elevation and the summit area can be in cloud, and temperatures range from the 40°s F to the 70°s F.  Ice, snow, sleet, rain and wind are all possible from 7,000 ft. up.

At sea level in Kīpahulu, hot and humid conditions prevail.  Expect passing squalls.

PARK LOCATION

In lower Kīpahulu Valley, the waters of Pīpīwai Stream course through steep, green Ōheʻo Gulch to the deep blue Pacific Ocean. On the high slopes of Haleakalā , upper Kīpahulu Valley, largely untouched by man, is ecologically intact and currently restricted to all but permitted researchers. Hawaiian cultural sites along the coastline, such as the remains of village sites and the flooded terraces that once grew the staple crop taro (also called kalo), are being revived and restored for park programs interpreting the many centuries of human habitation here. Take a walk along the coast to experience a sense of the bustling communities that once thrived here.

PARK LOCATION

EXPLORE THE PARK

Explore The Park Summit

In lower Kīpahulu Valley, the waters of Pīpīwai Stream course through steep, green Ōheʻo Gulch to the deep blue Pacific Ocean. On the high slopes of Haleakalā , upper Kīpahulu Valley, largely untouched by man, is ecologically intact and currently restricted to all but permitted researchers. Hawaiian cultural sites along the coastline, such as the remains of village sites and the flooded terraces that once grew the staple crop taro (also called kalo), are being revived and restored for park programs interpreting the many centuries of human habitation here. Take a walk along the coast to experience a sense of the bustling communities that once thrived here.

PARK LOCATION

Explore Kīpahulu District
Park Features

Hover to Discover

The Haleakalā Silversword descended from a plant in the sunflower family eons ago. The spiky silver ball blooms once in the plant’s lifetime.
There is no doubt that the stunning crimson ʻiʻiwi with its “creaky hinge” call is a “life list” bird for many.
Bright red ʻamaʻu fern fronds unfurl from this stunning native plant and gradually turn green as they mature.
To the surprise of many, the summit of Haleakalā volcano is an S-shaped erosional valley, not a round volcanic crater.
The endangered nēnē, or Hawaiian goose, was extinct on Maui at one time. But in the 1950s, nēnē were reintroduced to Haleakalā via Boy Scouts, who packed them into the backcountry in whiskey boxes.
A three-hour drive along the island’s north coast will bring you to lush and verdant Kīpahulu District.
Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association. P.O. Box 74 Hawaii National Park, 96718 HI

© COPYRIGHT HAWAIʻI PACIFIC PARKS ASSOCIATION 2017.

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